Replied to https://jamesg.blog/2020/09/08/rethinking-the-blog.html

You have hit upon one of the great conundrums of the IndieWeb - everyone loves static sites until they want to do something dynamic πŸ˜„

I know you already moved off Next.js but I use that now, and it can actually be a mix of statically generated and dynamic content which works great for me.

The other thing to look into is basically fancy build steps. I don't really know if it is common in Jekyll, but in things like Gatsby and 11ty it is quite common to have a build step that pulls data from external sources, then new builds can be fired by webhooks.

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James Gallagher in reply to: grant.codes Thanks for the webmention! I don't check my incoming ones enough. I must admit I am having some fun figuring out how to add features to my website without depending on dynamic generators. It has been difficult at many times, as you'll probably read on my blog. I even considered setting up a microservice API earlier today. I'm not at that point yet. I think Jekyll can go really far. Jekyll has a feature called generators that lets you add in extra build steps. I do want to try and cut down my build times and any additional API call I make will add to that time. September 10, 2020

Replied to https://grant.codes/2020/09/08/11-16-41

Thanks for the webmention! I don't check my incoming ones enough. I must admit I am having some fun figuring out how to add features to my website without depending on dynamic generators. It has been difficult at many times, as you'll probably read on my blog. I even considered setting up a microservice API earlier today. I'm not at that point yet. I think Jekyll can go really far. Jekyll has a feature called generators that lets you add in extra build steps. I do want to try and cut down my build times and any additional API call I make will add to that time.